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Posts Tagged ‘Nathan Van Coops’

day-after-never

“There’s a view from the top of the building next door. We can see both exits.”

Tucket points to the old, four story building to the right of the lab. He seems to be referencing something invisible in front of him as he explains.

“What have you got there?” I point to the ball in his hand.

“It’s a Third Eye Hot Shot.” Tucket says, grinning. I wait for him to explain further, but he seems to think it unnecessary. The reference isn’t completely lost on me, however. I recall that Third Eye is the name of a tech company that produces perceptor chips in his century. The perceptors allow direct access to the user’s mind, allowing them to see a modified environment around them called the meta-space. The meta-space acts like an amped up version of the Internet, but layered over real world spaces. It allows users to see and interact with everything from media and advertising, to actual functional controls for objects in the real world.

“You can use the meta-space all the way back in 2017?” I ask. Tucket shakes his head.

“There’s no input this far back. Meta-mapping won’t get completed till the 2080s. But since I have a portable unit, I have access to all the data and programs I’ve downloaded whenever I go.” He holds the ball up.

“Hot Shot is the best. Doesn’t come out till 2160, but I went up and got one before this trip, and it has tons of data already included from your time.”

“Like Google Maps for time travelers.”

“Google was actually the parent company.”

“Ah. Makes sense.” I stare at our target building. “So how do we get up there?”

— Van Coops, Nathan. The Day After Never: A Time Travel Adventure (In Times Like These Book 3) (Kindle Locations 2132-2141)

After In Times Like These and The Chronothon, The Day After Never is the third book in Van Coops’ time travel adventure series. He definitely left things open for another book.

While I rated the first two with three stars, which is pretty high for my ratings key, I gave this one only two. It’s still a time travel adventure, but this time, the author put in mysticism to make the plot work. The first two books were as hard-core time travel as it gets. By that, I mean that the entire plot and the action are completely based on the unique premises that time travel concepts bring with them.

This time he seems to have run out of unique time travel ideas. So he put in the Neverwhere, the place you go when you die, as a central concept. One of the Ben Travers that died in the second book is now one of the protagonists in the third book, living all in the Neverwhere. The book alternates between the two realities chapter for chapter, one in the Neverwhere, the other in the real world. In the Neverwhere, reality is conjured up by memories only. You can live in environments you can remember. You can also live in environments others can remember. And through memories you can create portals to the real world, invade those spaces and even people’s minds.

Time travel concepts are extended to space travel, and at one point Ben and his buddies travel on a space ship trailing a comet for a time travel anchor.

I am pretty sure that if you are reading this you are not whatsoever interested in this concept salad of a book. I wouldn’t be either. But having invested considerable time in Van Coops’ world of time travel by reading his first two books, I really didn’t have a choice, and I needed to finish it.

I like the man’s writing, and creativity, and world-building skills. I also enjoyed his somewhat unorthodox and risky use of the present tense in his story telling. You can see the fast pace of action this method creates when you read the except I have supplied at the top of this post. Van Coops is, after Niffenegger, my favorite time travel author. While the book by itself would only get a star and a half, given that it’s part of a trilogy, I give it two – sort of for an uplift.

Rating - Two Stars

 

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chronothon

After Ben Travers finally made it back to his apartment in 2009, he didn’t stay there long. Being home alone with nothing to do but going to work the next morning at the marina in St. Petersburg, fixing other people’s boats, he decided to look up his time-traveling girlfriend Mym. Along the way, in Manhattan, Ben gets snagged by a Mafioso and coerced into participating in a 25th century game show: The Chronothon. Think of a chronothon as a race, like our current Amazing Race on TV. The different levels are like trips on Amazing Race, and there are about a dozen levels to go through. As the racers start, they go through a time gate, which is also a space gate, and they appear in the desert in ancient Egypt. In each level, the racers have an objective they have to achieve. Usually the objective is an artifact of some type they have to find and bring to the next get to move on to the next level. As the racers go through the gates, they have no idea where they come out on the other side, neither where, or when. What further complicates the race it that not everything is what it seems. Might the game even be rigged?

The Chronothon is the second book in Van Coops’ time travel adventure trilogy. The first book was In Times Like These. Unlike some sequels, where the second book is much like the first book, but with a different story and twist, The Chronothon is a completely fresh story, based on the same time travel technology applied In Times Like These. While Van Coops wrote this to be a stand-alone book, and while I can imagine it might work that way, I would no recommend it. If you are interested in The Chronothon, you really should read In Times Like These first to have a grounding in the technology and the characters of this book.

For me, this was a page turner with surprises and delights in every chapter. Like the first book, everything about this story is related to time travel and its effects and challenges. It’s not a story about a game using time travel, it’s about how time travel can be used for a game.

The Chronothon was a little corny at times. For instance, on the planet Diamatra, there is a native sentient species, the Soma Djinn, which are centipede-like creatures that inhabit human hosts and turn them into cannibalistic zombies. I would expect that sentence either turned you off completely, or it made you want to read The Chronothon, just to figure out how a reasonable and well-read human being like me can give this book three stars.

But here you have it:

Rating - Three Stars

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